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2 girls, post-FIRE, home-free, slow traveling around the world

About us

We are Ali and Alison Walker, and we used to call Seattle, Washington our home. We met in 2004, married in 2006, and retired in 2018. After reaching FIRE (Financial Independence / Retire Early) we wanted a complete and total change from our career-focused lives. We decided that meant leaving our Seattle life behind and making travel our new lifestyle. By November of 2018 we had sold our home and car, let go of 99% of our belongings, and left Seattle. READ MORE…

Our Blog

We have separated our blog posts into 2 different categories. Alison writes our Money Crush posts, and Ali writes our Travel Stories. We hope one of our posts is useful for you. Please let us know what you think!

Recent Posts

Avoiding The RMD Cliff

Now that we have retired I have been thinking about Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs) from IRAs that must start when you hit age 70.5, and the potential dreaded “RMD Cliff.” The supposed negative impact of RMDs on your future tax bracket is a really important topic, and I’m tired of hearing, “Look out, it’s going to be scary in a few decades. Just wait and see how scary it will be.” Getting an answer like “It depends” is not good enough anymore. I want specifics! So I decided to build a spreadsheet that would help shed a little light on our potential RMD Cliff. READ MORE…

4 Months in SE Asia

2019 is our first year of early retirement after quitting our jobs and starting to live 100% off of our investments and savings. It’s also our first year as full-time travelers after selling our condo and getting rid of 99% of our belongings. So basically everything we have going on right now is new and exciting. People keep asking us what we are doing with our time. We are making an effort to share our stories through blogging and social media, which have become hobbies we really enjoy and thankfully they are also tools that help us meet new people and make friends as we travel. But mainly we spend our time exploring and learning about the places we visit, and we are also learning a lot about ourselves as we settle into this new nomadic lifestyle. READ MORE…

Q2 Update — Geoarbitrage 2019

Our first geoarbitrage year is really starting to unfold now that Quarter 2 is in the books. The good news is that we are on plan, pretty much exactly as projected. Looking back at Quarter 1 we started the year out in Southeast Asia where our cost of living and total spending were held at 75% of our monthly budget. Quarter 1 in Southeast Asia was important for our plan in order to balance out our spending as we spend the summer in Europe where the cost of living is much higher. READ MORE…

The Gift of Being Podcast Guests

We were recently guests on the Debt Free Guys’ Queer Money Podcast. The show is Episode 160, “5 Tips for Mastering Geoarbitrage.” We are definitely more introverts than extroverts, and this podcast was a big deal for us! We built our website and social media platforms so we could share stories about our personal experiences and make sure our friends and family had a way to follow us while we travel, and also as tools for connecting with people and making new friends along the way. One of the biggest surprises from our full time travels so far, is that our virtual networks have become really important to us.  READ MORE…

Credit Cards and Cash on the Road

One of the questions we get asked frequently is, “How do you pay for your daily purchases while traveling?” The way we handled cash, cards and purchases while we were in Asia for 5 months was definitely not like our routine when we are in the US. And it was also different from the way we did things in Europe last year. Our routine has definitely evolved over time as we changed from vacation travelers to full time nomads, but we also develop routines for handling our spending based on our specific location. In some countries we use a predominately cash based system and in others we put all purchases on credit cards. READ MORE…

The Sunk Cost Fallacy, in Travel and in Life

As we’ve become more mindful of our money we have also learned how the sunk cost fallacy can be a challenge to deal with. The sunk cost fallacy is the dilemma of worrying that our spent money would go to waste when a change in circumstance occurs. According to Christopher Olivola, an assistant professor of marketing at the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University, “The sunk cost effect is the general tendency for people to continue an endeavor, or continue consuming or pursuing an option, if they’ve invested time or money or some resource in it. READ MORE…

Calculating Your Net Worth

Remember – your net worth is not your self worth. And we all have money baggage. Knowing all of the intimate details of your own money can put you in a vulnerable place. And it can be exponentially more scary if you’re in a relationship, because you are exposing all of your fears to someone else. We worry about what other people will think about us if we confess we have big consumer debt. READ MORE…

The AOC Personal Money Statement

We have been managing our own investments and money for a while now. It has definitely taken us some time (years) to build the confidence we needed to go it alone. The process became much easier for us once we found all the amazing information online from the FIRE community. And we have learned a lot from other authors, bloggers, and podcasters in the financial independence/retire early movement. The overwhelming message that we have gotten is — we can do this on our own. No matter what the money question is, with some accurate information, personal focus and structure, we can manage our money ourselves just fine. And so can YOU! READ MORE…

Pools of Possibilities

I was on FaceTime the other day with a dear friend of mine and we were talking about emergency funds. This friend has a fund set aside that represents almost one year of their expenses. I think that’s quite impressive foresight to set this kind of money aside for their rainy day.Having that kind of money just “sitting” in the bank is hard for a lot of people. We have been told repeatedly we have to get our money to “work” for us. It has to earn interest, pay dividends, appreciate, and be invested right? READ MORE…

Visualizing Your Money

When considering this whole FIRE journey thing, it’s hard to figure out where to focus. Are we still paying off debt? Are we trying to buy a house? Have we been able to max out our 401k accounts? How much do we want to spend on travel? In our case, once we figured out our objectives, paying off mortgages and saving for travel, then we could really map out how to get there. READ MORE…